Independent travel older woman-Tours for female travellers: Nine of the best trips for women

This research was conducted by online travel company, Singles Holidays. The biggest growth area is in women over In previous generations, this group might have been reluctant to travel alone, but single, divorced and widowed women are now more empowered, confident and financially independent than ever before. And they are being more adventurous, with Sri Lanka, India and Peru among the most popular destinations. According to Cathy, the boom in singles holidays has been among the biggest trends in travel over the past few years, and this growth shows no signs of stopping.

Independent travel older woman

Independent travel older woman

I would like to be yr companion in travel and will be help and not Independent travel older woman tell me yes we can meet have travelled to most places in the world and matured guy. However Xxx homemademovies myself up and took to travelling. The main thing to enjoy life. Search this site. Reading all these comments from different places in the world it Born pregnant be great to set up, similiar to house swap, a group of international people who provided accommodation to solo travellers in their homes at no cost and the visitor would offer the host a bed in their home if they wanted to visit their country. Having traveled extensively around Southeast Asia and Central and South America for that matter I can confirm that where there are sidewalks and that's not everywhere Independent travel older woman often uneven or downright Independfnt of potholes.

Stocking high heels men. What Could Be Holding You Back From Traveling?

Health insurance. Keep a travel journal. Chieng Mai is cheap so you'll be able to get Independent travel older woman everywhere by cab. Since then, I've lived abroad for four years in three different countries and traveled all over Europe and Asia on my own. Steve Coogan. I'm older now but I hope to see New Zealand and Alaska one day. View offers. She is powerful because she does things differently. Somehow I don't feel I'm doing justice to Kyrgyzstan. Mix and match and if you wear the same thing over and Independent travel older woman, who cares? I am female, 66 years old llder in great shape and can use any oldrr for my adventure.

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  • The idea of exploring the world alone may be intimidating to some, but research shows that travelling solo is about to become increasingly popular.
  • Still basking in the afterglow of my recent trip to France, it reminds me of how I used to travel.
  • Like these questions from Travel Paint Repeat readers:.
  • Thinking of solo travel?
  • As many senior travellers have shared, my hubby is the stay at home kind but quite supportive of my itch to travel and see the world.
  • Then maybe arrange to join a group travelling out to the east?

I love traveling alone. I can live my life according to my own plan or lack thereof. I am totally free to do whatever I want and go wherever I want and know I will always meet someone new along the way…a new place…another conversation…and maybe another new friend.

The only barriers to traveling solo at any age are the limitations we put on ourselves. When we are entering our midlife years we have wisdom from a lifetime of experiences. I would like to dispel the myths about solo travel as a woman, especially for the midlife female traveler and provide insight into how easy it is to travel alone.

When you are on the road, the common bond is travel and the fact that you are out there experiencing what the world has to offer.

I have met and traveled with young men and women in their late teens and early twenties. I still keep in touch with some of the people I have met and have been honored to be asked to accompany them on other trips. Planning 2. Loneliness 3. Security 4. Accommodations 5. Costs 6. Money 7. Planning is always my first step in preparation. For an initial trip, Europe is a good place to start for the novice traveler and for the more adventurous, Asia is safe, easy and inexpensive.

I also read travel discussion groups such as Thorn Tree Lonely Planet to get current information. I read postings to get a sense of the current issues as well as specific information area highlights. Loneliness is rare when traveling alone. By staying in hostels and backpacker type accommodation I am always meeting new people, sometimes people with whom I hook up with to travel for a few days or perhaps to the next destination.

Local people, especially those in countries that are off the beaten track such as Asia and the Middle East, are always curious about this woman traveling on her own. Security usually includes keeping your money, personal belongings and yourself safe.

As we get older security seems to become more important. A money belt is a good way to keep money and personal documents out of the hands of a thief. Some people have pockets built in to underwear or their clothes. A money belt will protect you from most common types of thefts as clothes need to be removed in order to get at the valuables.

Some hotels and hostels have a safe available to guests. Another option is to lock the money in your suitcase or pack.

Accommodation should be booked for the first one or two nights at your destination. After booking, I research transport and costs to my hotel so that when I arrive I am prepared before I step into the fray of a busy airport or train station. Many accommodations will offer transportation from the airport for a fee.

With this budget, in Europe I stay in hostels and in developing countries I have a range of options from guesthouses with my own bathroom to a room with a shared bathroom.

In larger cities it is sometimes necessary to spend more to get a clean and appropriate room and in smaller cities you will spend less so in the end it balances out. If I stay in a hostel I look for a small dorm at a quiet hostel. Many hostels offer private rooms with ensuite or with a shared bathroom. If you live in North America, expect Europe to cost a little more, while developing countries will be considerably less expensive. When budgeting, I factor in costs for museums and cultural events that interest me and then include food costs.

To cut down on costs in Europe, I will go out for one meal a day and go to cafes for coffee, beer or a glass of wine. For other meals, I will buy local food and cook at the hostel or have a picnic in a park with local wines, cheeses and fruit.

These small snacks provide insight into the food and social life of the country without the expense of a larger meal. For more substantial and healthy meals I will go to the local market and buy produce and cook a simple pasta dish or vegetarian delight and pour a glass of wine and meet the other travelers at the hostel.

This middle of the road strategy has worked for me. It combines local food and culture, yet I can maintain a healthy diet and keep my costs moderate. In developing countries, transportation and accommodation are relatively inexpensive so I always eat at a restaurant or local market and normally stay in a pension or a guesthouse. Money is easy to access all over the world. When I travel, I prefer to obtain money in order of preference using a debit card, credit card, travelers checks or cash.

I leave a second debit card with a friend or family member in case the card I carry is lost, stolen or demagnetized. Besides convenience, the advantage of credit cards or debit cards is a more favorable exchange rate than at the banks.

If you use debit cards or credit cards your funds are converted at the wholesale exchange rate what you see in the newspaper rather than the retail rate at banks or cambios de change. The retail or bank rate is usually an additional two to ten percent higher than the rate at which the debit card or the credit card is converted.

I also take travelers checks as a backup as well as about dollars in US, Euros or Pounds for small conversions or emergency money. The cash is useful when crossing borders by land. Packing is challenging because you need to combine light luggage with necessity! Most independent travel sites will recommend that you travel light less than 22 pounds. The roll-aboard is good for flat surfaces and if you plan to take private transportation or taxis.

With backpacks, you have a choice between a top loading or a front loading style. For a recent eleven-week trip to South America Chile, Argentina, Uruguay , I took a rolling suitcase which converted to a backpack. My pound suitcase was taken as carry on. It is possible to pack light because generally, most everything is available in large cities. For long trips I take enough personal toiletries to last 6 — 8 weeks. I also always take a sarong which can be used for everything from a blanket to a towel.

With a little planning and by taking small steps the yearning traveler can be unveiled in each of us. I know independent travel by women of any age can be done, because I have done it. Since then, she has walked, trekked, bused and hitchhiked her way through six continents and over seventy countries. During her years of independent travel, she noticed the absence of women in her age group traveling solo. After trying to figure out how to effectively communicate the ease of independent travel to these women, she launched Spirited Bolder Women and as well as her blog.

Packing Planning is always my first step in preparation. This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

During my visit I criss-crossed the country and visited most regions, except a few of the ones too far to reach in the time I had. She left that tower long ago and saved herself. To me, the 'Stans' were a bit of a mystery, part Genghis Khan, part Lenin statuary. I like camping. You can also choose to be emailed when someone replies to your comment.

Independent travel older woman

Independent travel older woman

Independent travel older woman

Independent travel older woman

Independent travel older woman. Here are 15 things independent women do differently:

I don't necessarily want to sign up for an organised tour because I like to relax, shop in bazaars, do short walks in beautiful countryside without having to fit in with a schedule or other travellers who want to see everything and travel huge distances. Even april is the best time to visit North Pakistan and many foreign tourists book their blossom tours.

Regarding traveling alone, many individuals coming alone to these destination. These destination are the only places where many foreign tourists visit and feel their second home.

People are very friendly and very strong in their hospitality. Certainly, you will enjoy your days. Hunza of course, peace of land with of rich culture, history and adventure.

You will know many secrets of these people. I've heard that Gilgit Baltistan is very safe because of friendliness of people towards foreigners. Just wondered whether I'd be regarded with suspicion if travelling as a lone woman which of course is commonplace in the West but unusual in some parts of the world.

But does anyone know if a woman travelling alone as far as Hunza Karimabad could then hope to join other small groups travelling east towards Khunjerab Pass and back again - maybe camping or using guest-houses or inns along the way?

I understand the KKH is damaged in some parts and public transport can be difficult or dangerous. How dangerous? Dangerous for lone travellers? Dangerous because of increased risk of road accidents? I think public tranport is more dangerous than any other threat there. KKH is damaged at Attabad lake. Generally, travelling along KKH by bus you should be fine. Wear sensible clothes, and be alert, but it should be fine. Most buses go from Pindi to Gilgit , and thats probably the best option.

There are coasters minibuses that go to Pattan or Besham or Abbotabad, all of which are nice places, but there are not good or safe places for a single woman to stay in those towns, so I woudlnt recommend it on your first trip.

Once in Gilgit, there are buses and coasters to Hunza or to Skardu , and to most other places in the region. This topic has been closed to new posts due to inactivity. We hope you'll join the conversation by posting to an open topic or starting a new one. We remove posts that do not follow our posting guidelines, and we reserve the right to remove any post for any reason. Profile JOIN. Log in to get trip updates and message other travelers.

Every day the cruise manager spends about 15 minutes giving tips which could include or you can ask later how much a taxi to wherever should cost and then they will call a reputable taxi company for you.

Yes, with the US and Aussie based companies there is daily sightseeing included in the price but you do not have to join these organized tours. You can even leave the ship no price reduction and ask the ship to book you a hotel room then you can catch up to the ship the next day probably by train.

You can be as independent as you like. Also uniworld offers some departures when singles do not have to pay a supplement but they still get a double room.

It is nice, I think, to have the issue of where you are going to sleep and how you will travel taken care of so that you have more time to simply enjoy the holiday. Then too you will meet interesting and well-traveled English speaking folks on the ship but lots of Europeans in each town and village. Lastly the ship is like a boutique, European hotel with just 65 rooms so you will not feel like a number and you will enjoy the small hotel ambiance that it sounds like you want.

You will have access to experiences and people that you could not on your own and, all and all, if you are going to Europe, I think you would find it a very fulfilling voyage. There are lots of women who are independent solo travellers.

It's great to hear that you're thinking about it. Believe me, I know what it's like when you've never done it before. You might want to look it up 'Independent Travel Help'. I have written blog posts about working out what you want, thinking about how you want to travel because we are all different, and seeing it through. There are also blogs by other women such as 'Women on the Road' and 'Solo Traveler Blog' that are worth looking at.

I have considered doing the cruise in Europe but apart from finding it quite expensive, I would like to be adventurous and use local transportation as much as possible.

To overcome the language barrier, I am going to invest in a language translator which will, I hope, help me to communicate with the local folks. I am using London as my base, simply because my daughter is moving to London in a couple of weeks time and will by the time I arrive keeping fingers crossed have found a place to rent. It is a work transfer and so there should not be a problem. My initial plan was to get a Euro rail pass to visit Italy, Greece and Spain but that may be overly ambitious so perhaps I should just focus on Spain.

I will check out the blogs suggested. I have also recently looked at Journeywoman. Just before Christmas, I have successfully applied for membership. Now that Christmas is truly behind us and the new year has begun, I hope to contact a few members from different countries with a view of meeting these members when I eventually get to visit their part of the world. In some countries it is not cost efficient to use a Eurail pass because buying point to point tickets is much less expensive.

The Eurail passes are sold by a travel company and not by the local train companies so do check this out before you buy one! If you're thinking of going by train, check out Seat It's an invaluable resource.

I use it all the time. You can easily travel around Spain by train and bus. I was there a few months ago. There is a fast train but I thought it was too pricey.

It can be difficult finding public transport information before you travel but there are websites. I have written a post about car -free travel around part of Spain that you might find useful.

If you want me to, I could fish out the website addresses but it depends on whether the bus is a mode of travel you want to use. The same is true of Italy. The trains aren't always on time but you can get around fairly easily by train and bus. I was told it would be really difficult but it isn't that bad.

You can buy train tickets from a machine that translates into English. That is so handy! They have a fast train service now as well. Have you heard of couchsurfing or any of the other cultural exchange websites?

You can stay with people or just meet up. This is also a forum on the website and groups specially for women, solo travellers, over 50 travellers etc. You can just meet up for a coffee if you want. It's great for that. You can also Eat with a Local. I haven't tried that yet but it's worth checking out the website of that name.

There's also Airbnb, Wimdu and Housetrip among others where you can rent a room to a whole house rather than stay in a hotel. Hi Cupert, sounds like you are well on the way. Plan what you want to see, how to get there, how to use public transport. The forums help.

It is just a case of putting one foot in front of another - the same as at home. But you know your home well, just find out as much as you can about the place you are going and if you get stuck - ask for help. Choose hotels near transport and sights. Have a look at the reviews, you probably don't want one largely used by families. It's a good way of getting a feel for the place. I've used them to get from one venue to another, gives my feet and brain a rest.

Thanks for your kind assistance. Sorry for not thanking all the members here who have responded. Thank you so much for your input and your encouragement. I wish to apologise for not making an effort to visit here for quite sometime as I have been busy helping my daughter with her move to London in late January. As we have been closed and since I missed her so much, I kind of lost impetus for my solo travel. It is time for me to start putting some kind of itinerary together for my solo trip.

For this trip which will happen towards the later part of May, I have decided to focus my travel in England, Scotland and possibly Ireland. Not sure, if I should include Wales as well.

Seven Tips for Older Women Travelers

This research was conducted by online travel company, Singles Holidays. The biggest growth area is in women over In previous generations, this group might have been reluctant to travel alone, but single, divorced and widowed women are now more empowered, confident and financially independent than ever before. And they are being more adventurous, with Sri Lanka, India and Peru among the most popular destinations. According to Cathy, the boom in singles holidays has been among the biggest trends in travel over the past few years, and this growth shows no signs of stopping.

For more information, go to www. Inspired to make the leap? Lonely Planet has a new hub dedicated to the joy of solo travel. Check it out here. Andrea Smith. Women over 50 are leading the boom in solo travel in the UK. This year marks the centenary of women's suffrage in Britain and Poland , so it's quite fitting to learn that women over 50 are leading the boom in popularity for solo travel in the UK. Forget young backpackers, research has found that the average age of solo holidaymakers was 57 in , compared with 54 in Get inspired to travel everyday by signing up to our daily newsletter.

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Independent travel older woman