Gay religious monastic orders-Homosexual clergy in the Catholic Church - Wikipedia

Naked but for the towel around his waist, a man of a certain age sat by himself, bent slightly forward as if praying, in a corner of the sauna at a gym in central Rome. I had not met this man before, but as I entered the sauna, I thought I recognized him from photographs. My friends told me that this priest was gay, politically savvy, and well connected to the gay Church hierarchy in Rome. Yet as I looked at the man more closely, I saw that it was definitely him. When we were alone, I spoke his name, telling him mine.

Gay religious monastic orders

Gay religious monastic orders

Gay religious monastic orders

Gay religious monastic orders

Gay religious monastic orders

I felt weird in those places [clubs] as it was completely new to me, but week Breast voluptious week I began to get used to feligious environment. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. It was that I would die before anyone found out. Retrieved At the same time, to decouple the sexual-abuse crisis entirely from the question of gay priests is a willful avoidance of an ugly truth. During each interview, clarification questions were asked to negotiate the meaning deligious wanted to Gay religious monastic orders. Psychodynamic psychiatry in clinical practice. Kelly said he does not believe the president would be in this predicament had he stayed. It may force some kind of decision about the role orcers gay priests, clerical celibacy, and homosexuality across the church.

Embarrasing celeb pics. Introduction

Legal practice and scholarship. Ordo B. It sounds like such a beautiful life for both the religious and the people they serve with their prayer. Categories : Organisation of Catholic religious orders Catholic orders and societies Canonical structures. Views Read Edit View history. Elderly people, with strongly committed religious hearts and souls, no longer in Adidas gay uk vocation of marriage late in life due to the death of their spouse, who have no desire to either religgious alone, nor re-marry, but instead to order vows, and live out their days in the companionship of other religious, praying for all of us. The Catechism distinguishes between homosexual acts and homosexual tendencies. The Belgian college of Bishops elaborated that the sexual restrictions for seminary and priesthood candidates apply likewise for men of all sexual orientations. It recognized no totally indispensable religious vows and thereby abrogated for the Latin Church the special consecration that distinguished "orders" from "congregations", while keeping some juridical distinctions. Juridic and Gay religious monastic orders persons. Gallican Ambrosian Braga Gay religious monastic orders.

Lisa McClain does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

  • Particular churches.
  • Any known male religious orders which would accept older men, over 50 , who are widowers or divorced and anulled , who wish to live the remainder of their days in comtemplative life?
  • The canon law of the Catholic Church requires that clerics "observe perfect and perpetual continence for the sake of the kingdom of heaven".

The canon law of the Catholic Church requires that clerics "observe perfect and perpetual continence for the sake of the kingdom of heaven". In , the Church clarified that men with "deeply rooted homosexual tendencies" cannot be ordained. Nevertheless, a senior Vatican official confirmed a report in Corriere della Sera that gay men who are closeted and chaste abstain from sexual activity for at least three years will still be allowed to become priests, [2] and others have argued that the church would be unable to enforce an outright ban even if it tried.

However, this was left to bishops to enforce and most did not, holding homosexuals to the same standards of celibate chastity as heterosexual seminarians. Publication was made through the Congregation for Catholic Education. According to the new policy, men with "transitory" homosexual leanings may be ordained deacons following three years of prayer and chastity. However, men with "deeply rooted homosexual tendencies" or who are sexually active cannot be ordained.

No new moral teaching was contained in the instruction: the instruction proposed by the document was rather towards enhancing vigilance in barring gay men from seminaries, and from the priesthood. As the title of the document indicates, it concerned exclusively candidates with homosexual tendencies, and not other candidates. The Catechism distinguishes between homosexual acts and homosexual tendencies. Regarding acts, it teaches that Sacred Scripture presents them as grave sins.

The Tradition has constantly considered them as intrinsically immoral and contrary to the natural law. Consequently, under no circumstance can they be approved. In the light of such teaching, this Dicastery, in accord with the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, believes it necessary to state clearly that the Church, while profoundly respecting the persons in question, cannot admit to the seminary or to holy orders those who practise homosexuality, present deep-seated homosexual tendencies or support the so-called "gay culture".

The Belgian college of Bishops elaborated that the sexual restrictions for seminary and priesthood candidates apply likewise for men of all sexual orientations. Conditions listed for exclusion from the priesthood include "uncertain sexual identity" and "deep-seated homosexual tendencies". Over recent years Catholic on the religious right have tried to connect incidence of homosexuality within the priesthood to the sexual abuse scandal facing the Church arguing that the direct root "was not abuse of power, or pedophilia, or clericalism, or the distortive psychological effects of celibacy and institutional homophobia, but gayness itself.

Cardinal Raymond Burke has called for the Church to be "purified" of its "homosexual culture". Bishop Robert Morlino of Wisconsin has suggested a homosexual subculture was wreaking devastation and the Church therefore needed to show "more hatred of homosexual sexual behavior".

Michael Hichborn of the Lepanto Institute has suggested removing all gay clergy from the church, even though this might cause a shortage of priests. In Adomnan of Iona 's biography of Columba there is an anecdotal story about two priests with a strong attachment to one another "in a carnal way". One was Findchan, described as the founder of the monastery of "Scotic Artchain" in Tiree.

The other priest was Aed Dub. Peter Damian , in the 11th century, wrote a book called the "Book of Gomorrah" about homosexuality among the clergy in his own time period. He harshly condemned homosexual practice among the clergy.

In , Anselm of Canterbury demanded that the punishment for homosexuality should be moderate because "this sin has been so public that hardly anyone has blushed for it, and many therefore have plunged into it without realising its gravity".

This condemnation moderated considerably in the final decade of the twentieth century with the distinction now made by Catholic church authorities between homosexual orientation and homosexual activity, forbidding the latter while tolerating the existence of the former.

Pope Francis has directly faced questions from journalists about whether a "gay lobby" effectively operates within the Vatican itself, and investigative journalists have caught several high-ranking Vatican clerics engaging in homosexual sexual activity or relationships.

In October , on the day before the second round of the Synod on the Family , a senior Polish priest working in the Vatican, Krzysztof Charamsa , stated publicly in Italy's Corriere della Sera newspaper that he was gay and had a long-term partner. In his resignation letter he thanked Pope Francis for some of his words and gestures towards the gay community.

However, in contrast strongly criticized the institution of the Catholic Church for being "frequently violently homophobic" and "insensitive, unfair and brutal" towards people that are gay; noting the irony that he felt there were significant numbers of gay men active at all levels within the Church including the cardinalate. He called for all statements from the Holy See that are offensive and violent against gay people to be withdrawn, citing Pope Benedict XVI 's signature of the document that forbids men with deep-rooted homosexual tendencies from becoming priests as particularly "diabolical".

Studies find it difficult to quantify specific percentages of Roman Catholic priests who have a homosexual orientation either openly gay or closeted in the United States. Studies by Wolf and Sipe from the early s suggest that the percentage of priests in the Catholic Church who admitted to being gay or were in homosexual relationships was well above the national average for the country. The John Jay Report published in suggested that "homosexual men entered the seminaries in noticeable numbers from the late s through the s".

Another report suggested that from the mids onwards, Catholic priests in the US were dying from AIDS -related illnesses at a rate four times higher than that of the general population, with most of the cases contracted through gay sex, and the cause often concealed on their death certificates.

A follow-up study the next year by the Kansas City Star found the AIDS-related death rate among priests was "more than six times" the rate among the general population in the 14 states studied. Bishop Thomas Gumbleton of the Archdiocese of Detroit , has suggested that this was because, "Gay priests and heterosexual priests didn't know how to handle their sexuality, their sexual drive. And so they would handle it in ways that were not healthy. The visitation began in , and the final report issued in The report spoke about "difficulties in the area of morality Usually, but not exclusively, this meant homosexual behavior.

In March Cardinal Crescenzio Sepe , Archbishop of Naples, submitted a 1,page dossier to the Vatican that sought to identify 40 actively gay Catholic priests and seminarians across the country, after the list was compiled by a male escort called Francesco Mangiacapra. Although gay lifestyles have been condemned by the church, a number of senior members of the clergy have been alleged to have engaged in homosexual activity. Archbishop Rembert Weakland , who retired in , was alleged to have been in a relationship with a former graduate student; [32] Juan Carlos Maccarone , the Bishop of Santiago del Estero in Argentina, retired after video surfaced showing him engaged in homosexual acts; [33] and Francisco Domingo Barbosa Da Silveira , the Bishop of Minas in Uruguay , resigned in after it was alleged that he had broken his vow of celibacy.

The General Chapter of the Dominican Order held in Caleruega in "affirmed that the same demands of chastity apply to all brethren of whatever sexual orientation, and so no one can be excluded on this ground. Conditioning persons on their sexual orientation is not evangelical.

Jesus would not do so. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Part of a series on the Catholic Church Overview. Theologies Doctrine. Prayer Devotions Bible Biblical canon. Gallican Ambrosian Braga Mozarabic. Chaldean East Syriac Syro-Malabar. Byzantine Armenian. Alexandrian Ethiopic. Societal issues. Links and resources. For broader coverage of this topic, see Catholic Church and homosexuality.

Overview articles. Christianity and sexual orientation Christianity and homosexuality Christianity and transgender people History of Christianity and homosexuality The Bible and homosexuality Queer theology LGBT-affirming churches Blessing of same-sex unions. Denominational positions on homosexuality. LGBT Christian clergy. Further information: Homosexuality and Roman Catholicism. Main article: Gay bishops. Catholicism portal LGBT portal.

Retrieved October 7, Retrieved 18 December An upcoming church document does not decree a sweeping ban on gays in seminaries, allowing those who have lived chastely for at least three years to become priests, a senior Vatican official said Friday.

February 2, London: Guardian. National Catholic Reporter. Grocholewski, Prefect June 28, Congregation for Catholic Education of the Roman Curia. Retrieved 26 April Encyclopedia of Homosexuality. New York. Retrieved 26 April — via www. The Boston Globe. October 20, Los Angeles Times. Retrieved December 21, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. Retrieved July 17, Archived from the original PDF on 8 July Edge Boston.

Retrieved 5 March The Independent. KMGH Denver. September 9, September 14, Bay Area Reporter. New York Times. Retrieved 26 April — via IMDb. Catholic Church sexual abuse cases. In confession. Category:Catholic priests convicted of sexual abuse. Parish transfers of abusive Catholic priests 20th—21st century.

Hidden categories: Webarchive template wayback links CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list CS1 errors: missing periodical Articles with inconsistent citation formats All articles with unsourced statements Articles with unsourced statements from January Yours in Christ, Steven. However, in contrast strongly criticized the institution of the Catholic Church for being "frequently violently homophobic" and "insensitive, unfair and brutal" towards people that are gay; noting the irony that he felt there were significant numbers of gay men active at all levels within the Church including the cardinalate. I think the Servants of Charity has no age limits as it is all individual. As such, also the Teutonic Order may qualify, as today it is mainly monastic.

Gay religious monastic orders

Gay religious monastic orders

Gay religious monastic orders

Gay religious monastic orders

Gay religious monastic orders. Vocations for Men and Women

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Living in Sin? How Gay Catholics Manage Their Conflicting Sexual and Religious Identities

Naked but for the towel around his waist, a man of a certain age sat by himself, bent slightly forward as if praying, in a corner of the sauna at a gym in central Rome. I had not met this man before, but as I entered the sauna, I thought I recognized him from photographs. My friends told me that this priest was gay, politically savvy, and well connected to the gay Church hierarchy in Rome.

Yet as I looked at the man more closely, I saw that it was definitely him. When we were alone, I spoke his name, telling him mine. Yes, his plans had changed, he said, but he was leaving again the next day and would return only after I was gone. During the previous few days, I had heard a lot about this man. I had heard that he is a gossip, a social operator whose calendar is a blur of drinks and dinners with cardinals and archbishops, principessas and personal trainers.

Supposedly, he loves to dish male colleagues with campy female nicknames. But I would never have the experience firsthand. The priest was embarrassed: to have been chanced upon at this place; to have had his small evasions revealed.

The encounter was awkward. No, he did not wish to discuss the subject I was interested in. No, he did not think the subject worthwhile. These things he made clear. We left the sauna and, after further conversation, civil but stilted, went our separate ways. I could understand his discomfort. But in Rome these days the topic of gay priests in the upper reaches of the Holy See is hard to avoid.

The internal VatiLeaks report, according to La Repubblica, indicated that gay clerics in the Vatican were being blackmailed. Months later, another leak of confidential information brought the subject of a gay lobby back into the news. Someone took notes during what was meant to be a private meeting between Latin-American Church leaders and the new Pope, the former cardinal Jorge Bergoglio, Archbishop of Buenos Aires, now known as Francis.

In June, those notes were published on a progressive Catholic Web site. Gay lobby? It depends on what you mean. The term could refer to a shadowy group like the Illuminati, whose members quietly exercise supreme power. At the Vatican, a significant number of gay prelates and other gay clerics are in positions of great authority. And they inhabit a secretive netherworld, because homosexuality is officially condemned.

Though the number of gay priests in general, and specifically among the Curia in Rome, is unknown, the proportion is much higher than in the general population. Between 20 and 60 percent of all Catholic priests are gay, according to one estimate cited by Donald B.

Cozzens in his well-regarded The Changing Face of the Priesthood. For gay clerics at the Vatican, one fundamental condition of their power, and of their priesthood, is silence, at least in public, about who they really are.

Clerics inhabit this silence in a variety of ways. A few keep their sexuality entirely private and adhere to the vow of celibacy. Many others quietly let themselves be known as gay to a limited degree, to some colleagues, or to some laypeople, or both; sometimes they remain celibate and sometimes they do not.

A third way, perhaps the least common but certainly the most visible, involves living a double life. Occasionally such clerics are unmasked, usually by stories in the Italian press. The cardinal vicar of Rome was given the task of investigating. There are at least a few gay cardinals, including one whose long-term partner is a well-known minister in a Protestant denomination.

Whether he received this privileged access from some friend or family member, or from a client, is impossible to say; to see a known rent boy in black leather on a private Vatican balcony does raise an eyebrow. The Vatican holds secrets so tightly that it can make Fort Meade look like a sloppy drunk. Yet dozens of interviews with current and former gay priests, gay monks, veteran Vatican journalists, Italian aristocrats, and gay men at Roman gyms, bars, nightclubs, sex clubs, and restaurants suggest that, riveting as the more graphic stories are, they convey a limited part of the reality of gay clerical life in Rome.

To be gay in the Vatican is no guarantee of success, mark of belonging, or shortcut to erotic intrigue. Most basically it is a sentence of isolation. Gays in the Vatican are creatures of a cutthroat bureaucracy whose dogmatic worldview denies or denigrates their own existence. They live in a closet that has no door. Denunciation and exposure have made gay priests figures of fascination—though less as people than as symbols—especially to the secular far left and the religious far right.

Both sides find these clerics to be politically useful. The left uses them to level charges of hypocrisy. The right sees them as a stain in need of removal. They all got a shock late last July when Francis made his first direct public statement about gay clerics since becoming Pope.

During an impromptu press conference aboard the papal jet, en route from Rio de Janeiro to Rome after his first overseas trip, Francis was asked about the so-called gay lobby. If a person is gay and is searching for the Lord and has goodwill, who am I to judge him?

He spoke these words with a palpable warmth, unlike the embattled, wary tone that other Popes have adopted. Tales of gays in the Vatican have been told for more than a thousand years.

Some such stories are better substantiated than others. Even while their reliability is questionable, they demonstrate that playing the gay card even if you yourself are gay is an ancient Curial tactic.

They are the ones who are always forgotten, and read out of the story from both sides. When Paul VI assumed the throne, in , by one account he took his papal name not from any predecessor but from a former lover, a film actor. That at least was the contention of the provocative gay French writer Roger Peyrefitte, whose allegations about Paul VI caused such a stir that Paul took to the balcony of St. Paul looked a laughingstock, and the Curia learned a lesson: better to ignore such charges than to amplify them by denial.

By the s, the center of gay life in Rome was a cruising area called Monte Caprino, on the Capitoline Hill. At a small party of gay monks and their friends in Rome last summer, conversation turned to recollections of that place. The area was a target for muggers and thieves, who figured rightly that clerics would make ideal victims because they had much to lose by the public act of pressing charges.

One gay former seminarian recalled a night when three men beat him up and stole his wallet while numerous men in the crowded park stood by. Gay clerics often fail to help one another, he says, for the same reason that no one tried to help him the night that he was robbed: solidarity entails the risk of being outed.

Self-centeredness can breed a sense of entitlement. There has been plenty of scandal, though. The priest was acquitted on all charges after claiming that he fled because he feared he was being kidnapped. In a investigation of contract fixing for construction projects, Italian police wiretaps happened to catch a papal usher and Gentleman of His Holiness, Angelo Balducci, allegedly hiring male prostitutes, some of whom may have been seminarians, through a Nigerian member of a Vatican choir.

The choir member was dismissed; Balducci was convicted on corruption charges. Pope Benedict was rumored to have ordered that prelates who were living double lives be retired or removed from Rome. Marco Politi speculates that perhaps as many as 30 were eased out. Andrews and Edinburgh. Even Benedict has been dogged by rumors that he is gay. It is more or less impossible for gay clerics to articulate their affections in any way that does not amount to what an Anglo-Saxon mind might see as hypocrisy.

Yet such a dualistic existence is very much a part of Church tradition. This is the country that tolerated the sexual escapades and serial frauds of former prime minister Silvio Berlusconi with scarcely a hint of protest from the hierarchy of the Catholic Church. The culture of deception operates according to signals and conventions by which gay clerics navigate their lives.

Camp is perhaps the most powerful and pervasive of these codes, though it can be difficult to define. Ironic, effeminate self-mockery—allowing priests to exercise some limited rebellion against their own isolation and invisibility—is one form of clerical camp. It shows a plain-looking cardinal watching a runway show of over-the-top clerical attire—which ends when the departed Pope steals the show by appearing in the glorious garb of a Sun God.

It was about how we should appear. Which in turn puts a premium on outward appearance and enforces conformity to a certain official ideal. This is what makes us powerful. Not the protection of medieval institutions. But la bella figura matters just as much at ordinary moments. Especially for clerics who break the vow of celibacy, it is crucial to keep up appearances in the normal course of life. Gay saunas are good places to meet other gay priests and monks. The best times to find clerics at the saunas are late afternoon or evening on Thursdays when pontifical universities have no classes or Sundays after Mass.

Some gay celibate clerics use the saunas not for sex but to experience a sense of fellowship with others like themselves. Everyone knows everything. The more senior the cleric, the more likely he may be to play loose with the rules. Some Curia officials are said to handpick extremely handsome men for menial jobs in order to make Vatican City more scenic.

A layman I know whose job requires frequent trips to the Vatican used to enjoy flirting with a muscular go-go boy who danced on the bar at a gay nightclub in Rome.

One day at the Vatican, this layman was amazed to see the dancer out of context, dressed in the uniform of a security guard. Sometimes talking to gay priests feels like reading stories by Borges. For those who want it, organized networks can provide some grounding. A few small groups of gay Catholics in Rome operate publicly, but because anyone can come to their meetings, it can be risky for priests, especially Vatican officials, to be part of them.

One private group of about 50 gay priests and laymen meets once a year, for a kind of retreat.

Gay religious monastic orders

Gay religious monastic orders

Gay religious monastic orders