Chemotherapy protocols for breast cancer-Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer | Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Chemotherapy for breast cancer uses drugs to target and destroy breast cancer cells. These drugs are usually given directly into a vein through a needle or as a pill. Chemotherapy for breast cancer frequently is used in addition to other treatments, such as surgery, radiation or hormone therapy. Receiving chemotherapy for breast cancer may increase the chance of a cure, decrease the risk of the cancer returning, alleviate symptoms from the cancer or help people with cancer live longer with a better quality of life. If the cancer has recurred or spread, chemotherapy may control the breast cancer to help you live longer.

Chemotherapy protocols for breast cancer

The extracted records retrieved by both of the databases will be merged and duplicates will be removed on the basis of title and year of publication using MS Excel Repeat cycle every 21 days for 8 cycles. To assess the efficacy of taxanes in comparison to anthracyclines as NACT. The following information will be extracted from the eligible full-text studies: Publication details: year, language, country, authors, journals, phase Baseline factors: age, menopause status, cancer stage, hormone status ER, PR, HER2grade Inclusion criteria Size of study population: overall as well as in each arm Playboy babe video and comparator details Follow-up time Treatment: Chemotherapy protocols for breast cancer and doses, radiotherapy, hormone therapy; and duration of treatment Outcome variables. Table 1 Objective-specific interventions and comparators. Adjuvant anastrozole versus exemestane versus letrozole, brfast or after 2 years of tamoxifen, in endocrine- sensitive breast cancer FATA-GIM3 : a randomised, phase 3 trial.

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Side effects may get worse during the course of treatment. Adjuvant docetaxel or vinorelbine with or without trastuzumab for breast cancer. They are used to put medicines, blood products, nutrients, or fluids right into your blood. After a few sessions, you may be able to predict more accurately when you'll feel fine and when you may need to cut back on activities. Lancet Oncol. Request an Appointment Chemotherapy protocols for breast cancer Mayo Clinic. Repeat cycle every 14 days for 4 cycles. Ado-trastuzumab emtansine Kadcyla [package insert]. If this happens, it is usually within 10 years after treatment. Discuss the benefits and risks with your doctor. Accessed July 5,

Clinical Trials: The NCCN recommends cancer patient participation in clinical trials as the gold standard for treatment.

  • Clinical Trials: The NCCN recommends cancer patient participation in clinical trials as the gold standard for treatment.
  • Chemotherapy for breast cancer uses drugs to target and destroy breast cancer cells.
  • Chemotherapy chemo uses anti-cancer drugs that may be given intravenously injected into your vein or by mouth.
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It may seem like you're facing a big alphabet soup of medicine combinations when you and your doctor start to talk about which chemotherapy regimen might be best for you. There are a number of tried-and-true chemotherapy regimens used to treat breast cancer, including:.

Your doctor also may recommend using only one medicine at a time such as Adriamycin or another anthracycline, or a taxane Taxotere, Taxol, or Abraxane. You and your doctor will consider several important factors when deciding on a chemotherapy regimen:. It's important to remember that while there are many standard chemotherapy regimens, each person's treatment plan will be unique because each cancer is unique. Doctors have developed and tested effective treatment plans of different lengths and dosages using different medicines.

Most short-term chemotherapy side effects can be managed with lifestyle changes and medicines that can help reduce nausea, fatigue, and the risk of infection. If you're concerned about side effects, talk to your doctor. After reviewing all the options, you and your doctor will decide on a chemotherapy regimen, dosage, and length of time to receive it that's right for you. Your ideal chemotherapy regimen will:. Search Breastcancer. Was this article helpful?

For breast cancer patients, the central line is typically placed on the side opposite of the underarm that had lymph nodes removed for the breast cancer surgery. Typically, if you have early-stage breast cancer, you'll undergo chemotherapy treatments for three to six months, but your doctor will adjust the timing to your circumstances. Methotrexate injection. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemo is often given for a total of 3 to 6 months, depending on the drugs used. Some of these are more common with certain chemo drugs. Melisko ME, et al.

Chemotherapy protocols for breast cancer

Chemotherapy protocols for breast cancer

Chemotherapy protocols for breast cancer

Chemotherapy protocols for breast cancer

Chemotherapy protocols for breast cancer

Chemotherapy protocols for breast cancer. Chemotherapy drugs used for breast cancer

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Chemotherapy for breast cancer - Mayo Clinic

Chemotherapy for breast cancer uses drugs to target and destroy breast cancer cells. These drugs are usually given directly into a vein through a needle or as a pill. Chemotherapy for breast cancer frequently is used in addition to other treatments, such as surgery, radiation or hormone therapy. Receiving chemotherapy for breast cancer may increase the chance of a cure, decrease the risk of the cancer returning, alleviate symptoms from the cancer or help people with cancer live longer with a better quality of life.

If the cancer has recurred or spread, chemotherapy may control the breast cancer to help you live longer. Or it can help ease symptoms the cancer is causing. Chemotherapy for breast cancer also carries a risk of side effects — some temporary and mild, others more serious or permanent.

Your doctor can help you decide whether chemotherapy for breast cancer is a good choice for you. After you have surgery to remove a tumor from a breast, your doctor may recommend chemotherapy to destroy any undetected cancer cells and to reduce your risk of the cancer recurring.

This is known as adjuvant chemotherapy. Your doctor may recommend adjuvant chemotherapy if you have a high risk of the cancer recurring or spreading to other parts of your body metastasizing , even if there is no evidence of cancer after surgery.

You may be at higher risk of metastasis if cancer cells are found in lymph nodes near the breast with the tumor. When considering adjuvant chemotherapy, ask your doctor about how much the chemotherapy will reduce your chance of the cancer coming back. Together you can weigh this decrease in risk against the side effects of the chemotherapy. Also discuss with your doctor other alternatives, such as hormone-blocking therapy, that might be effective in your situation. Chemotherapy is sometimes given before surgery neoadjuvant therapy to shrink larger tumors.

This may:. Preventive medications known as chemoprevention reduce the risk of breast cancer in women with a high risk of the disease. They usually include estrogen-blocking medications, such as selective estrogen receptor modulators and aromatase inhibitors. These medications carry a risk of side effects, so doctors reserve these medications for women who have a high risk of breast cancer.

Discuss the benefits and risks with your doctor. If breast cancer has spread to other parts of your body and surgery isn't an option, chemotherapy can be used as the primary treatment. It may be used in combination with targeted therapy. The main goal of chemotherapy for advanced breast cancer is generally to improve quality and length of life rather than to cure the disease. Chemotherapy medications travel throughout the body.

Side effects depend on the drugs you receive and your reaction to them. Side effects may get worse during the course of treatment. Most side effects are temporary and subside once treatment is finished. In some cases, chemotherapy can have long-term or permanent effects. In the process of targeting fast-growing cancer cells, chemotherapy drugs can also damage other fast-growing healthy cells, such as those in the hair follicles, bone marrow and digestive tract. Several chemotherapy drugs can affect nerve endings in your hands and feet, leading to numbness, pain, burning or tingling, sensitivity to cold or heat, or weakness in your extremities.

These side effects often go away after treatment is finished or within a year after completing chemotherapy. In some cases, they may be long lasting. In most cases, these problems go away within a year of completion of the chemotherapy. Your doctor can prescribe drugs to help reduce nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.

You can also talk with your doctor and chemotherapy nurse about measures you can take to minimize side effects. If chemotherapy damages your infection-fighting blood cells, your doctor may adjust your doses or add medications that help your bone marrow to recover more quickly.

One possible side effect that may not go away is infertility. Some anti-cancer drugs damage ovaries. This may cause menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Menstrual periods may become irregular or stop amenorrhea. If ovulation ceases, pregnancy becomes impossible. Depending on your age, chemotherapy may induce a premature permanent menopause.

Discuss with your doctor your risk of permanent menopause and its consequences. If you continue to menstruate, you may still be able to get pregnant, even during treatment. But because the effects of chemotherapy are dangerous to the fetus, talk with your doctor about birth control options before treatment begins. Feelings of fear, sadness and isolation can compound the physical side effects of chemotherapy, both during and after treatment.

During chemotherapy, you have regular contact with and support from oncologists and nurses. Everyone involved is working toward the same goal — completion of treatment with the best possible outcome. When it's over, you can feel as if you're alone, with no one to help you return to normal life or deal with fears of breast cancer recurrence.

Consider talking with a mental health professional who works with people who have cancer. It may also help to talk with someone who has been in the same situation. Connect with others through a cancer-survivor hotline, support group or online community.

Chemotherapy for breast cancer may not work in all people. Your doctor considers a number of factors to determine whether and what kind of chemotherapy would benefit you. The higher your risk of recurrence or metastasis, the more likely chemotherapy will be of benefit.

In some cases, characteristics of the breast cancer itself may suggest other more beneficial, less harsh treatments, such as endocrine therapy hormone therapy with estrogen-blocking medications. Discuss your treatment goals and preferences with your doctor. Factors commonly considered include:. Because chemotherapy can affect fast-growing healthy cells, such as your white blood cells, platelets and red blood cells, it helps to be as healthy as possible before you begin treatment, to minimize its side effects.

Ask your doctor what side effects you can expect during and after chemotherapy and prepare. For instance, if your chemotherapy treatment will cause infertility, you may wish to store sperm, fertilized eggs embryos or eggs for future use.

If your chemotherapy will cause hair loss, consider a wig or head covering or scalp cooling therapy. Most chemotherapy treatments are given in an outpatient clinic. Most people are able to continue working and doing their usual activities during chemotherapy.

Your doctor can give you an idea how much the chemotherapy will affect your usual activities, but it's difficult to predict just how you'll feel. Prepare by asking for time off work or help around the house for the first few days after treatment. If you'll be in the hospital during chemotherapy treatment, arrange to take time off work, and find someone to take care of your usual responsibilities at home.

Be sure your doctor knows about any medications or supplements you're taking, including any herbal supplements, vitamins or over-the-counter drugs. These may affect the way the chemotherapy drugs work. Your doctor may suggest alternative medications or that you not take the medications or supplements for a period before or after a chemotherapy session.

Your doctor or nurse will let you know what you can and can't eat or drink on the day of your chemotherapy session. It may help to take a family member or friend with you to the treatment session for support and companionship. Chemotherapy for breast cancer is given in cycles.

The cycle for chemotherapy can vary from once a week to once every three weeks. Each treatment session is followed by a period of recovery. Typically, if you have early-stage breast cancer, you'll undergo chemotherapy treatments for three to six months, but your doctor will adjust the timing to your circumstances.

If you have advanced breast cancer, treatment may continue beyond six months. If you have early-stage breast cancer and you are also scheduled to receive radiation therapy, it usually follows chemotherapy. There's an array of chemotherapy drugs available. Because each person is different, doctors tailor certain types and doses of medications regimens — often a combination of two or three chemotherapy drugs — to the type of breast cancer and the person's medical history.

Most breast cancer chemotherapy sessions take place at an outpatient unit in a hospital or clinic. Chemotherapy drugs can be given in a variety of ways, including pills you take at home. Most often they're injected into a vein IV. This can be done through:. Some people feel fine after a chemotherapy session and can return to their schedules and activities. Others may feel side effects more quickly. You may want to arrange for someone to drive you home afterward, at least for the first few sessions, until you see how you feel.

After a few sessions, you may be able to predict more accurately when you'll feel fine and when you may need to cut back on activities. Marking your calendar or keeping a journal may help you track your general response to chemotherapy sessions and help you plan events accordingly.

Following your treatment plan closely is the best way to get the most benefit from your chemotherapy. If side effects become too bothersome, discuss them with your doctor. He or she may be able to adjust the dose or type of chemotherapy medication you're receiving or prescribe other medications to help relieve some symptoms such as nausea. If the number of white cells in your blood drops, your doctor may stop your chemotherapy until your white cells return to a safe level.

Relaxation techniques such as meditation and deep breathing may help reduce stress. And exercise has been shown to help improve sleep and lessen fatigue caused by chemotherapy. Wearing wigs, hats or turbans can make hair loss less obvious. After you complete chemotherapy treatment, your doctor will schedule follow-up visits — usually every four to six months at first and then less frequently the longer you remain cancer-free.

This is to monitor you for long-term side effects and to check for recurrence of the breast cancer.

Chemotherapy protocols for breast cancer