Flu shot when pregnant-Flu shot in pregnancy: Is it safe? - Mayo Clinic

Influenza flu is more likely to cause severe illness in pregnant women than in women of reproductive age who are not pregnant. Changes in the immune system, heart, and lungs during pregnancy make pregnant women and women up to two weeks postpartum more prone to severe illness from flu, including illness resulting in hospitalization. A common flu symptom is fever, which may be associated with neural tube defects and other adverse outcomes for a developing baby. Getting vaccinated also can help protect a baby after birth from flu. Mom passes antibodies onto the developing baby during her pregnancy.

Flu shot when pregnant

If you do have flu, there's a prescribed medicine you Argentina brunetti topless take that might help, or reduce your risk of complications, but it needs to be taken very soon after symptoms appear. Read on for some of the most common questions oregnant answers about getting a flu shot during pregnancy. Yes, it's safe to get a flu shot during pregnancy. A fact sheet with more information on this topic is available. When is the best time to have the vaccine during pregnancy? All rights reserved. Pregnant women should get a flu shot and not the nasal spray flu Flu shot when pregnant. When should I have the flu jab?

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You can also stop by a flu shot clinic at your local pharmacy or supermarket. Changes Flu shot when pregnant the immune system, heart, and lungs during pregnancy make pregnant women and women up to two weeks postpartum more prone to severe illness from flu, including illness resulting in hospitalization. Symptoms Flu symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or shoot nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Cancel Continue. Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website. All these places give flu vaccines that are licensed and approved for use in the United States. Whenn is very important for pregnant women to get the flu shot. Flu shots Flu shot when pregnant been given to millions of lregnant women over many years with a good safety record. Qhen shots given during pregnancy help protect both the mother and her baby from flu. There is thimerosal-free flu vaccine available for people who want to avoid thimerosal. Breastfeeding also has many benefits, including helping to protect infants from infections like flu. Several studies conducted by CDC and partners support Liittle pink nudes safety of the flu vaccine for pregnant women and their babies.

Influenza flu is more likely to cause severe illness in pregnant women than in women of reproductive age who are not pregnant.

  • In the United States, flu shots are recommended for everyone ages 6 months and older, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Influenza flu is more likely to cause severe illness in pregnant women than in women of reproductive age who are not pregnant.
  • Women have permitted doctors and pharmaceutical companies privileged access to their fierce and primitive drive toward protecting a pregnancy.
  • Time to roll up your sleeve for your flu shot!
  • Influenza flu is more likely to cause severe illness in pregnant women than in women of reproductive age who are not pregnant.
  • Flu season is starting to ramp up, and that raises an important question: How can you keep yourself and your baby safe from this year's flu?

Influenza flu is more likely to cause severe illness in pregnant women than in women of reproductive age who are not pregnant. Changes in the immune system, heart, and lungs during pregnancy make pregnant women and women up to two weeks postpartum more prone to severe illness from flu, including illness resulting in hospitalization. A common flu symptom is fever, which may be associated with neural tube defects and other adverse outcomes for a developing baby.

Getting vaccinated also can help protect a baby after birth from flu. Mom passes antibodies onto the developing baby during her pregnancy. Pregnant women should get a flu shot and not the nasal spray flu vaccine. Flu shots given during pregnancy help protect both the mother and her baby from flu. Vaccination has been shown to reduce the risk of flu-associated acute respiratory infection in pregnant women by about one-half. Pregnant women who get a flu vaccine are also helping to protect their babies from flu illness for the first several months after their birth, when they are too young to get vaccinated.

Flu shots have been given to millions of pregnant women over many years with a good safety record. There is a lot of evidence that flu vaccines can be given safely during pregnancy. It is very important for pregnant women to get the flu shot. Breastfeeding also has many benefits, including helping to protect infants from infections like flu.

If you get sick with flu symptoms call your doctor right away. There are antiviral drugs that can treat flu illness and prevent serious flu complications. CDC recommends prompt treatment for people who have influenza infection or suspected influenza infection and who are at high risk of serious flu complications, such as pregnant women and people with asthma, diabetes including gestational diabetes , or heart disease.

Early treatment of flu in hospitalized pregnant women has been shown to reduce the length of the hospital stay. Flu symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people may also have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is most common in young children.

People may be infected with the flu and have respiratory symptoms without a fever. This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptom that is severe or concerning. Flu vaccination: a growing trend among pregnant women pdf icon [ KB, 1 page].

Fact Sheet pdf icon [ KB, 2 Pages, 8. Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options Skip directly to A-Z link. Influenza Flu. Section Navigation. Minus Related Pages. On This Page. Symptoms and Treatment If you get sick with flu symptoms call your doctor right away. Symptoms Flu symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue.

Early Treatment is Important for Pregnant Women Treatment should begin as soon as possible because antiviral drugs work best when started early within 48 hours after symptoms start.

Antiviral drugs can make your flu illness milder and make you feel better faster. They may also prevent serious health problems that can result from flu illness. Oral oseltamivir is the preferred treatment for pregnant women because it has the most studies available to suggest that it is safe and beneficial.

Antiviral drugs require a prescription from your doctor. Having a fever caused by flu infection or other infections early in pregnancy may be linked to birth defects in a baby. Additional Resources for Pregnant Women. For Health Care Professionals. Clinical Infectious Diseases external icon.

What CDC Does. To receive weekly email updates about Seasonal Flu, enter your email address: Email Address. What's this? Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website. Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the website.

You will be subject to the destination website's privacy policy when you follow the link. CDC is not responsible for Section compliance accessibility on other federal or private website. Cancel Continue.

Section Navigation. Quadrivalent flu vaccines — offered for the first time in the flu season — protect against the same strains as the trivalent vaccine, as well as an extra influenza B strain. The flu shot is made from an inactivated virus, so it's safe for both mother and baby during any stage of pregnancy. Minus Related Pages. Minus Related Pages. Give today.

Flu shot when pregnant

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Flu Vaccine Safety and Pregnancy | CDC

Back to Your pregnancy and baby guide. It's recommended that all pregnant women have the flu vaccine, whatever stage of pregnancy they're at. One of the most common complications of flu is bronchitis , a chest infection that can become serious and develop into pneumonia.

Women who have had the flu vaccine while pregnant also pass some protection on to their babies, which lasts for the first few months of their lives.

The best time to have a flu vaccine is in the autumn, from the beginning of October to the end of November. If you've missed this time, you can have the flu vaccine later in the winter although it's best to get it earlier. Contact your midwife or GP surgery to find out where you can get the flu vaccine.

It's a good idea to get vaccinated as soon as possible after the vaccine becomes available in September. In some areas, midwives can give the flu vaccine at the antenatal clinic.

Yes, because the viruses that cause flu change every year. This means the flu and the vaccine this year may be different from last year. The vaccine does not contain any live viruses, so it cannot cause flu. Some people get a higher temperature and aching muscles for a couple of days afterwards, and you may feel sore at the injection site.

Find out more about flu vaccine side effects. If you miss having the vaccine for any reason, you can still have it up until you go into labour. Find out more about the whooping cough vaccine in pregnancy. Talk to a GP as soon as possible. If you do have flu, there's a prescribed medicine you can take that might help, or reduce your risk of complications, but it needs to be taken very soon after symptoms appear.

Find out more about vaccines to protect you and your baby during pregnancy. Page last reviewed: 10 September Next review due: 10 September The flu jab in pregnancy - Your pregnancy and baby guide Secondary navigation Getting pregnant Secrets to success Healthy diet Planning: things to think about Foods to avoid Alcohol Keep to a healthy weight Vitamins and supplements Exercise. When you can get pregnant Signs and symptoms When you can take a test Finding out.

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Why are pregnant women advised to have the flu vaccine? When should I have the flu jab? What should I do? Find out more about vaccines to protect you and your baby during pregnancy Page last reviewed: 10 September Next review due: 10 September

Flu shot when pregnant

Flu shot when pregnant