Models of artistic development reconsidered-

The present study analyzes scribbling in all its subphases and discovers a clear intention behind young children's gestures. We will provide a selected number of graphical examples that are representative of our theory. These drawings 13 in total were extracted from a much wider sample derived from our studies on children's graphical-pictorial abilities, conducted on children aged 0—3 years in various Italian nurseries. Our results appear to indicate that scribbling evolves through a series of stages, and that early graphical activity in children is sparked and maintained by their relationship with their caregivers and the desire to communicate with them. As children develop, they acquire new meaningful gestures that help them understand and interact with the world that surrounds them.

Models of artistic development reconsidered

Models of artistic development reconsidered

Models of artistic development reconsidered

Models of artistic development reconsidered

Models of artistic development reconsidered

We have chosen to do so by reporting a number of suggestive examples 13 that we have drawn from a much wider sample derived from our studies Longobardi et al. Reconsiderec is not just the affective behavior that influences children's manner of experiencing objects, but also artisti own motor behavior helps in determining a dynamical perception of Mosels Werner and Kaplan, ; Ebersbach et al. Understanding Children's Drawings. Children, aided by adults, progress inside their own Zone of Proximal Development Vygotsky, and gradually begin to master abilities that had not been Artisti until that moment, abilities such as scribbling. What he could not grasp with his hand, he had grasped with the aid of the line, intangible as the picture he wanted to touch. And so, the handle of a mug, for Freeman and Janikounis drawn to make the object recognizable, but for the child, a cup is not an object you observe, it is something you drink from, Models of artistic development reconsidered to Painful sex missed period so, you have to draw the handle. Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf.

Man escort services. Introduction

In this model, it is Models of artistic development reconsidered that all societies undergo changes from traditional, transitional and modern stages of development. Studies in Art Education, 44 3 To be connoisseurs and critics — as Parker C. The welfare state can provide various types of social services for the people, like education, health, employment, social security and public distribution system. Studies in Art Education. Eisner, like John DeweyLicence to lick clear that our ability to know is based in our ability to construct meaning from experiences. Hong Kong University. Main picture: Photo by Daniel Posthuma on Unsplash. From early in his schooling he displayed considerable talent and this was encouraged by his mother — who hoped he might be a commercial artist Uhrmacher To conceive of students as artists who do their art in science, in the arts, or the humanities, is, after all, both a daunting and a profound aspiration.

Intuitively, most people have a notion of what this term entails.

  • Professor Anna M.
  • In a very general way, we can say Development means the securing of social and economic growth by changing the conditions of under-development through organised and planned efforts aimed at the control of poverty, hunger, disease, illiteracy, and economic and industrial under-development.
  • Professor Kindler joined UBC in
  • See, also, on these pages: elliot w.
  • .

Intuitively, most people have a notion of what this term entails. Depending on their cultural origins, artists and art educators may point to the improvements in technique and ability to control and manipulate the medium or to an increase in complexity, detail, and expressiveness of images. Search all titles.

Search all titles Search all collections. Your Account Logout. Handbook of Research and Policy in Art Education. Edited By Elliot W. Eisner, Michael D. Edition 1st Edition. First Published Imprint Routledge. Pages pages. Subjects Education. Back to book.

Models of Artistic Development Reconsidered. By Anna M. Pages

Conversation, learning and democracy 3e. Scarfe Indeed, this was a case that Lawrence Stenhouse made with some force with regard to the difficulties that classroom teachers had with more process-oriented approaches to curriculum during the s see the article on curriculum theory and practice on these pages. Development has to be measured on the scale of happiness and not consumerism and profit-making. These include the Kettering Project begun in providing curriculum materials for new and untrained elementary teachers and based around his theories and the Getty Center for Education in the Arts he served on the advisory board from on. Those who want to reduce education to training; constrain exploration by specifying preset outcomes; and focus on what can be accredited rather than experienced and learnt, will have profound difficulties in approaching Elliot W. Eisner argues that the distinctive forms of thinking needed to create artistically crafted work are relevant not only to what students do, they are relevant to virtually all aspects of what we do, from the design of curricula, to the practice of teaching, to the features of the environment in which students and teachers live.

Models of artistic development reconsidered

Models of artistic development reconsidered

Models of artistic development reconsidered

Models of artistic development reconsidered

Models of artistic development reconsidered

Models of artistic development reconsidered.

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The present study analyzes scribbling in all its subphases and discovers a clear intention behind young children's gestures. We will provide a selected number of graphical examples that are representative of our theory. These drawings 13 in total were extracted from a much wider sample derived from our studies on children's graphical-pictorial abilities, conducted on children aged 0—3 years in various Italian nurseries.

Our results appear to indicate that scribbling evolves through a series of stages, and that early graphical activity in children is sparked and maintained by their relationship with their caregivers and the desire to communicate with them. As children develop, they acquire new meaningful gestures that help them understand and interact with the world that surrounds them. Scribbling is one of these gestures. To see these first traces as a mere consequence of the gesture of drawing or simple hand movement Burt, ; Callaghan, ; Dunst and Gorman, would mean evaluating the graphical product without taking into consideration the level of development of its author.

Historically, authors have judged the graphical activity, in the form of scribbles, of children aged 2 or 3 years old, in terms that are exclusively kinesthetic, or of pure motor pleasure, e. However, giving such an exclusive interpretation of this phenomenon means not considering the development that children undergo during their second year of life.

The emergence of mental representations and, thus, the ability to use a signifier to evoke meaning, would not seem to be compatible with an activity that stimulates the pleasure of mere exercise. Nonetheless, the vast majority of researchers of child art insists that children are doing nothing more than exercising their limbs.

The hypothesis that the reason for which children begin to draw in the first place is their desire for graphical representation or pictorial figuration Thomas and Silk, ; Papandreou, , does not allow researchers to evaluate correctly the meaning of scribbles or to reflect on the reasons that make them such a gratifying activity. The first scribbles appear during the child's second year of life and to not grasp a form of intentionality in their production is the observer's limitation and not the child's.

A child's gestures, at age 2, are never mere motor activity; the youngster is able to point, say no with his or her finger, manipulate many objects, grasp things, push them away, hit them, and pummel them as well Pinto et al.

When the child transfers his or her hand's activities to the line, only then he or she draws. Now, the first drawings never have the intention of representing the formal aspects of reality by means of graphical schemas, but, instead, they tell of a world perceived physiognomically by using the line's expressiveness.

Starting from our theory, the questions that we asked ourselves were: a How does scribbling develop? Does it evolve through different stages, much like drawing does, and can these be classified? With this study, we intend to delineate the first phases of children's drawing through the different meanings that the line acquires progressively, from gesture to representation.

We have chosen to do so by reporting a number of suggestive examples 13 that we have drawn from a much wider sample derived from our studies Longobardi et al. We shall present said examples along with our theory, as we advance through its various stages. The child does not discover the line in a fortuitous manner. Adults always tend to attribute children their own ways of thinking and, consequently, believe they share their same joy of discovery; but what excites children is not discovery in itself, it is discovering they are able to do things.

When we have talked about the beginning of graphical activity, we have often underlined the child's apparent lack of interest for his or her creations Thomas and Silk, ; Ring, and this has made us believe that children draw mostly for the satisfaction they receive from the mere motor activity of this gesture. In our experience as a researchers of child art Quaglia and Saglione, ; Longobardi et al.

In fact, they imitate the gesture and not the result. To behave like an adult is the child's most primitive and intense source of joy. His or her desire is to receive the adult's attention, firstly for what he or she can do, and secondly for what he or she has done.

The interest toward his or her artistic creations begins once the child has moved from acting like adults, to doing what adults do, while striving for better oculomotor control. No activity is relevant in itself, but it acquires relevance when it becomes the symbol of a relationship. Our theory is coherent with Vygotsky's ideas on learning through imitation, and Bruner's social-constructivist perspective. Children, aided by adults, progress inside their own Zone of Proximal Development Vygotsky, and gradually begin to master abilities that had not been developed until that moment, abilities such as scribbling.

The adult's role in this process is vital: it is only through the meaningful relationship that the child has established with his or her caregiver that graphical abilities can flourish and develop completely. For the child, the objects of the external world are not just geometric figures: they are also elements of dynamic events. Children have little interest for the static qualities of objects, but they are quite fascinated by their dynamic properties.

In other words, the objects of the external world can be desirable or scary, good, or bad, and they are experienced mostly through the affective and motor behaviors of the subject. Child animism is children's tendency to perceive things as living and endowed with intentionality Piaget, ; Morra, The line is filled with the intentionality of the gesture and it initially translates the affective qualities of the objects through its physiognomical characteristics.

Therefore, alongside the semantical gestures of Yes and No, as described by Spitz , we witness the appearance of a second dyad of gestures: caressing and hitting. Children caress what they like and hit what hurts them. In these new gestures, we discover the cause of the creation of the line. Young Stefano aged 18 months , after having discovered scribble-writing, began to develop an interest in books, writing over them, or, better yet, re-writing them. In the attempt to save the books, his parents bought him books that were appropriate for his age and full of pictures.

He immediately began to scribble over them, but the line did not resemble writing anymore, instead it began to show two distinct formal organizations: a soft, round line good line and a thick, broken line bad line.

What he could not grasp with his hand, he had grasped with the aid of the line, intangible as the picture he wanted to touch. When faced with pictures that were scary, instead, the child would hit them violently with the tip of the pencil or rub them until they disappeared. The act of scratching to grasp and hitting with the hand, had thus been substituted with a graphical behavior that had the same purposes. The line, as an extension of the hand, expresses its same affective meanings and intentions.

By using the line, the child managed to represent the dynamical aspects of the dog and control a reality that he found menacing. We witness this same kind of intention in Matthews' in Matthews, , p. The line, when perceived physiognomically as the act of caressing or hitting, ideally represents the child's relationship with events or objects of the external world through two types of traces: good traces, round, and soft, and bad traces, heavy, and disorganized.

In short, the child's entire graphical production initially presents this double formal aspect, and where we, as observers, see vertical, horizontal, ovoid, oblique, or spiral lines Kellogg, ; Uttal et al. And since reality can be defined essentially as good or bad, the use of good and bad traces, exhausts all of the child's representative necessities. Such traces and line styles have a universal nature Golomb, and belong to culturally inherited symbolic systems that children naturally learn to use for their own expression e.

At the beginning of the drawing experience, children have no desire to reproduce the formal qualities of objects, but the positive or negative experiences that stem from the encounter with the objects of reality. Summing up, in the affective relationship with the outside world, the child notices correspondences between the dynamical properties of such objects and his or her internal statuses of emotional evaluation.

Graphical activity, like any other play activity in general, allows the child to mediate some important affective relation between internal and external world, reproducing them in an area in which reality may be corrected and controlled. When the mediation attempt succeeds, we can notice a certain degree of satisfaction in the child. The criteria for success reside in the physiognomic characters of the child's perception, for which the lines come to life and act upon the objects, representing them affectively.

Graphical activity absolves many functions from the start, one of which is play. Anna aged 33 months loved to play with stickers. She was then asked to point out where she was located inside the drawing.

Without hesitation, she indicated the vertical lines in the middle of the drawing. After finishing the drawing, the child was asked to make another drawing, this time of Enzo, the classmate she disliked most because, according to her, he was mean. Michele 32 months old playing scatolino , a positive self-portrait. In this example, we can distinguish three different types of scribbles, each one representing the same person in three different moments. In Elena's drawing aged 34 months , we can observe in a much clearer manner what has been stated up to this point.

These two kinds of traces, round in one case and broken in another, not only express an action per se , but most of all they express the good or bad quality of the action in itself. In these types of scribbles Longobardi et al. The sheet of paper, thus, becomes a play area and the line is the instrument that animates the child's characters and fantasies. The process of naming a scribble does not indicate the child's desire to represent reality or his or her recognition of some sort of similarity between the drawing and a random object, but, instead, it would simply indicate that the scribbles have become the symbolical witnesses of experiences with objects experimented by the child, mostly through an affective behavior.

This would also mean that children alter the line's quality, color, and shape to express their feelings about certain topics, and that these vary depending on whether they regard them as positive or negative Burkitt et al. The physical-geometrical qualities of reality are knowledge's final form: as Piaget , tells us, all of the newborn's initial behavior can be defined by saying that he views the world as a reality to be discovered through tasting and suckling Anning and Ring, Subsequently, after having gained an erect stance, children become more and more interested in the objects that surround them.

It is not just the affective behavior that influences children's manner of experiencing objects, but also their own motor behavior helps in determining a dynamical perception of reality Werner and Kaplan, ; Ebersbach et al.

On the other hand, children are naturally immersed in a world that moves and makes noises and we can notice this fascination with the dynamical properties of objects in their graphical activity, most of all in the onomatopoeic scribble , which is any trace that is accompanied, during its creation, by an onomatopoeic expression. On such occasions, he enjoyed drawing a line that expanded over the floor and stretched through the whole apartment.

Stefano's 18 months old first onomatopoeic scribble, the motorcycle. Although he was not able to produce a figurative drawing, Stefano had imagined a moving object and had graphically represented precisely the movement associated with this particular sound.

Then, with an overarm action, aims the pencil down into the pencil box on the table. Certainly, the onomatopoeic scribble does not exhibit any qualities that qualify it as a real drawing, but it can, in fact, become so, if we assess it while referring to the child's representative goal.

We can no longer accept the hypothesis that scribbles are a mere motor expression and, at the same time, we cannot support the idea that no form of representation is possible without figurative schemes. With onomatopoeic scribbling, children conclude a very important part of their graphic development because the line goes from representing their fantasies to progressively assuming the shape of the objects which it depicts Quaglia and Saglione, Now, in the measure with which the objects take form on the sheet of paper, they lose their real speed, symbolized by the movement of the line, and they acquire it in the realm of pure imagination.

In other words, the line visibly symbolizes the actions performed by the imaginary objects; in the schematic drawing, instead, the represented objects are sufficient to testify the actions they now perform only inside the child's own imagination. The artist's emotive states, after the acquisition of a figurative schema, will reveal themselves in the subjects of his or her drawings: objects that are loved or feared.

According to Kellogg , pre-scholastic and scholastic institutions are responsible for imposing on children the reproduction of real objects, and this would determine the end of child art and the beginning of a graphical activity that no longer supports the child's expressive needs Einarsdottir et al.

Luquet , instead, believes that children casually begin to notice some analogies between their chaotic productions and real objects. Freeman has a similar stance on this argument, stating that children begin to reproduce reality spontaneously, since their sole motivation for drawing can be found in the production of graphical or pictorial representations.

Actually, as we are trying to demonstrate, it is not the representative intent that favors the birth of figurative drawing, but the gradual passage from the objects' dynamical properties to their formal qualities. Children that seek or find analogies between their graphical product and a real object, reveal a new level of organization of their cognitive development and this is not a casual or fortuitous event.

Beginning of fixation of the dynamical characteristic of the object in specific parts i. The motorcycle as a primitive figurative drawing, containing all the elements that are necessary for its recognition. Furthermore, we can notice important parallel transformations between the development of drawing skills and language development Vinter et al.

Thus, we can witness a reorganization of both the child's language system, which allows for better communication effectiveness, and graphical system, with the appearance of figurative schemes Malchiodi, ; Jolley, In both cases, owing to the child's improved intellectual abilities, we notice the emergence of behaviors that are more adequate to the comprehension of the person receiving the message, be it spoken, or graphic.

Scribbling, as movement, represents actions in the form of verbs; now, with figurative drawing, it is as if the child had added the subject of the action to his graphical discourse. Nonetheless, the objects' dynamical elements or aspects do not disappear, instead their presence gives them function. Children do not want to communicate an object's structural information Freeman, , through a canonical perspective Hochberg, , ; Anning and Ring, , they just want to make their drawing meaningful.

Models of artistic development reconsidered